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Singapore Government

Social and Family Research Fund

Research Grants

Social and Family Research Fund

Aim

As our society evolves and as our families adapt to the rapid changes around them, it is critical for policymakers to continuously reassess policies, identify and address needs, leverage on opportunities, and prepare for the future. 

The MSF Social and Family Research Fund (SFRF) was introduced in 2008 to support research which identifies emerging trends and issues, strengthen the evidence base for social and family development policies and improve the Ministry’s forward planning capabilities to respond quickly and effectively to new challenges and opportunities. By providing funding support to researchers, the Ministry aims to promote ground-up research initiatives which can potentially inform and make a difference to Singapore’s social and family landscape.

Grant Categories

The MSF Social and Family Research Fund offers two grant categories:

  • Undergraduate Category
  • Post-graduate/Academic Category

The 15th Grant Call is now open! Please click on the respective category tab below for more details.

Applications for the Undergraduate Category will close on 16th December 2022.

Applications for the Post-graduate/Academic Category will close on 28th February 2023.

Social and Family Research Fund Undergraduate Category

Click on the following links to scroll to the sub-section directly

 

Eligibility

  • Honours year Singaporean undergraduates doing their theses at recognised universities in Singapore.
  • Final-year Singaporean undergraduates at recognised overseas universities who will conduct their research in Singapore.

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Project Team

Applicants may submit the proposal individually or jointly with other Honours year undergraduate students (up to 5 team members per project).

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Topics of Inquiry and Indicative Areas of Interest

Applicants are to submit research proposals that are relevant to the work of MSF. Proposals with a primary focus on healthcare/medical research will not be funded, as the SFRF is meant to support research with direct relevance to MSF's areas of work. Proposed research are strongly encouraged to fall under the SFRF Topics of Inquiry, although this is optional for undergraduate proposals. Research proposals on MSF's Indicative Areas of Interest within these Topics of Inquiry will be viewed favourably.

15th Grant Call (2022) - Topics of Inquiry and Indicative Areas of Interest

Topic 1: Enabling Families with Risk Factors/Additional Needs

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Understanding the challenges faced by families with risk factors and/or additional needs, how they cope and what more can be done to help. Such families include families with persons with disabilities, children/young persons in out-of-home care, persons-at-risk (e.g., family violence), neglected elderly, problem gamblers, those with incarceration history etc.

 

Topic 2: Building Strong Foundations for Families

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Understanding motivations and types of support needed for marriage and parenthood decisions
  • Understanding the various familial ties/support (e.g., caregiving, grandparenting, active fathering, spousal division of household duties etc.) across diverse family archetypes and families across different life stages (e.g., families with infants, pre-schoolers, families with teens and tweens children)
  • Studying outcomes relating to such familial support and how to encourage closer relations and greater support
  • Studying the influence of shrinking household sizes on familial support

 

Topic 3: Facilitating Better Outcomes for Low-Income Households

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Identifying risks and/or protective factors (e.g. skills, strengths, resources) among low-income families - How to mitigate risk factors and increase protective factors to lead to better outcomes, including community-led and asset-based models
  • Understanding the profiles, needs and outlook of low-income elderly; how community and social services can support aging in place and mitigate risks of social isolation and unstable housing

 

Topic 4: Early Childhood Education: Support for Children, Families, and Operators

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Understanding the best way to provide support for children from low-income families and children with developmental needs
  • Examining impact and quality of preschool education (e.g. preschool factors that influence child outcomes, effect of educator-related factors including teacher training on teaching quality/child development, quality of teaching and interactions in preschools, child outcomes of preschool support for child's bilingual acquisition)

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Funding

Successful applicants will:

  • Receive a grant of up to S$1,000 per research project from MSF
  • Sign a Research Agreement with MSF on the terms of funding

Stages of funding

  • After the signing of the Research Agreement, MSF will disburse 70% of the approved grant.
  • MSF will reimburse the remaining amount based on actual expenditure following the Secretariat's assessment of:
    1. Final report approved by applicant's supervisor (within 2 months after project completion).
    2. Primary research output (including questionnaires and anonymised research output, e.g. datasets, interview transcripts, electronic resources).
    3. Progress report on the research project,including all receipts and supporting documents.
  • Funding that has been disbursed but was not used upon the completion of the research project must be returned to MSF.

Funding terms

The grant should be used exclusively for conducting the research project, including:

  • Transport cost incurred during local fieldwork
  • Incentives or tokens to research respondents
  • Printing cost of survey questionnaires and other fieldwork materials
  • Any other items necessary for conducting the research

The grant does not cover expenses such as:

  • Tuition fees and other administrative charges imposed by the universities as part of the course of study
  • Overseas research travel expenses
  • Purchase of hardware or equipment
  • Purchase of software and license
  • Cost of printing and binding thesis report for submission to institution
  • Refreshments for meetings

MSF will fund only expenditures incurred after the signing of the Research Agreement with the successful applicants.

Applicants should secure approval of their research proposals and the endorsement to apply for the grant from their project supervisor at the application stage

Upon successful application, recipients should obtain clearance from the Institution’s Research Ethics Review Board before any funds can be disbursed.

Successful applicants shall not receive any research funding from other agencies. Changes to the research project cannot be made without prior written consent of MSF.

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Application Process

Applicants are to submit their application through the SFRF online application form at https://go.gov.sg/sfrf-undergrad.

Applicants are advised to prepare the following information before filling up the online application form:

(A) Detailed research proposal

Applicants are required to prepare a detailed research proposal to be submitted as a separate document during the online application process. The proposal should meet the following criteria:

  • Not more than 10 pages (page count excludes the references and annexes)
  • Drafted using Arial font with a font size of 11 and 1.5-line spacing
  • Total file size of the proposal should not exceed 1 MB
  • File format used should be Microsoft Word DOCX

The proposal should address the following:

  • Research objectives, background, purpose, significance
  • Brief literature review
  • Research questions
  • Relevance to social and/or family research
  • Proposed methodology
  • Research limitations, i.e. limitations of proposed methodology or research approach
  • References cited should be provided at the end of the document
  • Required data analysis and expected use of findings

(B) Itemised breakdown of the research grant required

Applicants are required to prepare (i) detailed breakdowns and (ii) calculation basis for each expenditure item for the following budget categories in the online application form:

Budget Category Notable Points
Transport cost incurred during fieldwork
  • The most economical mode of transport should be used.
Incentives or tokens for respondents’ participation
  • The type of incentives/tokens to be provided (e.g. shopping vouchers and the denomination) and the targeted sample size should be stated.
  • The justification for the requested quantum of incentive/token should be stated (e.g. type of interview to be conducted, length of interview, requirement of respondents to travel to interview venues, etc.)
Cost of printing questionnaires used for research
  • Cost of printing and binding thesis report for submission to institution is not supported.
Cost of items needed for conducting the research
  • Example of items in this category: stationery required for fieldwork.
  • Purchase of software and software licences will not be supported.
  • Purchase of hardware or equipment (e.g. reference books, mobile phone, data storage devices, PC/laptop/tablets, camera and recorder etc.) will not be supported. Only rental costs for hardware or equipment will be considered.

Cost calculations should be projected as accurately as possible (i.e., to the nearest dollar). The total grant is capped at S$1,000.


(C) Other details required for the online application

  • Personal particulars of applicant(s)
  • Curriculum vitae (CV) of each applicant in Microsoft Word DOCX file format (File size of each CV should be less than 1 MB)
  • Summary of research proposal (in no more than 200 words)
  • Estimated start and end dates of research study
  • Details of ethics clearance of research proposal (if applicable)
  • Details of application of funding of research study from other sources (if any)
  • Details of applicant’s scholarships or financial support received (if any)
  • Contact details of project/thesis supervisor

The application for the 15th Grant Call (Undergraduate Category) will close on 16th December 2022. The results will be available approximately 1.5 months after the submission of all the required application documents. MSF reserves the right to cancel an application if the required documents are not submitted by the closing date.

All applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their application early in order to provide sufficient time for MSF to conduct its funding evaluation before successful applicants can begin their data collection.

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Evaluation Criteria

MSF will consider the following factors:

  • The relevance of the research in promoting understanding of social and family trends and issues in Singapore
  • The contribution of the research to social and family policy development in Singapore
  • The rigour of the proposed research methodology and analytical techniques
  • The proposed project costs

The grant is awarded on a competitive basis and MSF’s decision is final.

Applicants are encouraged to submit research proposals that are relevant to the work of MSF and should refer to this webpage for Topics of Inquiry and Indicative Areas of Interest and past projects.

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Publication and Data Sharing

MSF supports SFRF recipients in presenting and publishing your research findings (e.g. in journals, conferences and other channels), subject to the terms stated in the Research Agreement endorsed by both parties.

MSF may also invite SFRF recipients to share research findings at suitable platforms.

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Contact

For more information or queries, please contact MSF Social and Family Research Fund (SFRF) Secretariat at email MSF_SFRF_Secretariat@msf.gov.sg

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Frequently Asked Questions


Application

I am interested in applying for the SFRF. Are applications accepted throughout the year?

The SFRF is open for application once a year. Any application submitted outside the application period will not be accepted. Please refer to the SFRF webpage at https://www.msf.gov.sg/researchfund for the application period.


Who can apply

I am a final year student with a local university. I am not conducting the research study as part of my thesis or university course requirement. Can I apply for the SFRF?

Yes, MSF will consider your application on a case-by-case basis. Please identify a Faculty Member as your supervisor to endorse and oversee your proposed research.


I am a third year undergraduate student, and would like to apply for SFRF funding to do my thesis, which will only start in my 4th year (Honours Year). Can I do so?

You are encouraged to submit your application in your 4th year when your thesis proposal has been finalised and endorsed by your supervisor.


Funding

Can I start the SFRF project according to the planned start date in my research proposal before MSF has informed me on the outcome of my SFRF application?

You can choose to start your project based on your timeline. However, please note that MSF will only fund approved research expenditures incurred after the Research Agreement is signed.

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Past SFRF Undergraduate Recipients and Projects

Click on the following links to scroll to the year of the Grant Call directly

 

2021 Grant Call

Topic: The Role of Executive Functions on Direct and Indirect Bullying in College Students: The Moderating Role of Violent Media Exposure

This research examines the impact of executive function and violent media exposure on school bullying behaviour among college students.

  • Fiona Ng Zi Ling
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University

 

Topic: Stress Profiles Differentially Predict Executive Functions in Older Adults: A Latent Profile Analysis

This research examines how unique stress profiles - emotion-related stressors, health-related stressors, situational-related stressors and social-related stressors - exert differential impacts on executive functions in older adults.

  • Choy Cheng Mun, Megan
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University

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2020 Grant Call

Topic: Digital Adaption and Educational Support: Challenges of Low-Income Families in Singapore during the COVID-19 Pandemic

This research studies the effects of COVID-19 on low-income families’ digital adaptation. It focuses on the challenges, coping strategies and parenting practices pertaining to how parents support their children in the use of digital technologies for home-based learning.

  • Tay Mei Ling
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Clara Choo Jia En
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

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2019 Grant Call

Topic: A Qualitative Study on Factors Influencing Early Childhood Educators' (De)Motivation in Singapore

The study aims to explore the factors, at the personal, social, cultural and institutional levels, motivate and demotivate early childhood educators, and how these factors interact with one another to shape the early childhood educator’s decision to stay in or leave the profession. In addition, the study also aims to examine the differences in the motivational and/or de-motivational factors for educators teaching in government-funded childcare centres and large commercial operators.

  • Chua Jin Yi
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Impact of Parent-Child Media Engagement on Mobile Devices on Language Development During Early Childhood

The study aims to investigate the impact of parent-child media engagement on mobile devices on a child’s language development (i.e., receptive vocabulary and phonological awareness) in pre-schoolers. The study also examines potential moderators, i.e., media usage and content—for the relation between parent-child media engagement and language development. Given the paucity of research on the underlying mechanism, the study also examines selective attention as a potential factor that mediates the relation between parent-child media engagement on mobile devices and language development during early childhood.

  • Ng Li Ting
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University

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2018 Grant Call

Topic: Unravelling the Remedy to the Effects of Work-Family Conflict on Child Outcomes

In a competitive and fast-paced country such as Singapore, many working parents report difficulty achieving work-life reconciliation. Accumulating evidence suggests that conflict between family and work life exerts negative impact on children, as well as working adults themselves. This study aims to examine (i) whether parents’ WFC relates to their pre-school children’s self-regulation and (ii) whether parental characteristics – boundary management practice and trait mindfulness – moderate the WFC-SR link, using multi-source data collected from parent-child-teacher triads.

  • Hon An Chi
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Impact of Mothers’ Work and Family Boundaries on Family Dinner Outcomes

This study seeks to investigate predictors of working mothers’ involvement in family dinner. Specifically, this study aims to examine whether working mothers’ work-family boundaries relate to family dinner frequency and mealtime interaction quality. Data show that the involvement of Singapore working mothers in family dinner has declined. This is concerning given research findings on the benefits of family meals, such as heightened family identity and reduced risk of childhood obesity. Knowledge of the antecedents of family meal may help foster these positive outcomes.

  • Tan Hwee Boon, Simone
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Family Environment as a Contributing Factor to Brain Synchrony in Mother-Child Dyad in response to Social Interactions

The family has long been recognized as having a critical role in children’s development. Development of emotion regulating abilities are also found to be crucial to the child’s success later on in life. Research has shown that dyadic parent-child synchrony early in childhood has a long-lasting impact on the child’s later social abilities. In this study, a multi-level approach is utilized where the contributions of the family environment to the mother and child responses to emotional events are examined. More specifically, Nears-Infrared Spectroscopy will be used to detect brain synchrony in the mother-child dyad when exposed to different emotional situations.

  • Leck Wan Qing
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Are two heads better than one? Determining the relationship between spousal synchrony, relationship quality and resilience in a neurological context

The transition to parenthood is one of the most important, yet stressful, periods for the family. To deal with familial stress, relationship quality between spouses is of utmost importance. This study aims to make use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy and electrocardiogram readings to uncover features of spousal synchrony, thus clarifying the role of spousal synchrony in contributing to marital satisfaction. Additionally, this study aims to determine if spousal synchrony has a relationship with individual levels of resilience.

  • Lim Mengyu
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Exploring the Interactions, Tensions and Negotiation Process between Family and State: A Study of Fostering Policies and Foster Families in Singapore

Foster families are unique, as they mimic normative ideals of a ‘family’, by taking a nuclear family form comprising a couple and children, yet they also receive much closer inspection and regulation by the state than ordinarily so. Foster children are identified as a vulnerable population, due to past experience of trauma. Foster care inevitably causes the displacement of children from their natural homes into a new, foreign family environment, which points to its potentially disruptive nature. The study aims to uncover the challenges and risks of foster care to better inform policy and programme development.

  • Faith Kwok
    Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: How does Social Network Discourses Affect Mature Workers Understanding of Health and Economic Policies?

Policy literacy is increasingly important, especially amongst the elderly who must now navigate complex policies that has been revised extensively. This study aims to find out whether the various personal networks and connections our senior citizens have formed would influence their policy literacy and what will constitute as social network to them. The study also hopes to find out the potential measures that communities and governments do to assist them, especially “solo-agers” with limited networks to rely on.

  • Lim Jing Wei
    Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

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2017 Grant Call

Topic: Understanding the Saving Patterns of Lower-Income Individuals

The objectives of this research are to uncover some of factors that explain the saving behaviour of Singaporeans, especially that of the low-income individuals. While it is intuitive that low income individuals are less able to save, thus have lower savings, there might also be other significant factors that result in their low savings rate, such as their willingness to save. Upon understanding the factors that affect their savings decisions, institutions can act accordingly to encourage saving.

  • Lee Jia Min, Jasmine
    Department of Economics, National University of Singapore

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2016 Grant Call

Topic: Too Young to Get it: Eldercare Arrangement in Family for Young Onset Dementia Patients

The objectives of this research are to explore the different types of eldercare arrangement in family and the various factors that affect the types of arrangement provided for Early Onset Dementia Patients.

  • Yong Jing Rong
    Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Singaporean Parents’ Perspectives And Experiences On Raising A Child With Autism

This study aims to better understand the insights of parents with children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This included their diverse experience ranging from negotiation of identity between the resources provided by government and Voluntary Welfare Organisations, lay public’s perception of ASD and their views on their child’s future prospects.

  • Chong Hui Xian Jessica
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: The Right to Education: An Inclusive Education for the Deaf in Singapore

The study serves to find out the attitudes and concerns of both parents of typically-developing children and parents of deal children towards inclusive education and the mainstream integration policy in the context of Singapore.

  • Stephanie Loo Pei Ning
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: The Influence of Culture and Familial Values on Subjective Well-being: Comparison between Chinese and Malays in Singapore

This research examines the predictive power of cultural and familial factors on differences in happiness between the two ethnic groups in Singapore (i.e. Chinese and Malays) and explore how different dimensions of cultural and familial indices vary in their effect on subjective well-being.

  • Sarah Chan Hian May
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Siti Halimahtul Raudah
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

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2015 Grant Call

Topic: Absence for a Cause? A Study on Pre-school Attendance Rates of Children from Low-income Households

This study aims to better understand the insights of parents with children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This would include their diverse experience ranging from negotiation of identity between the resources provided by government and Voluntary Welfare Organisations, lay public’s perception of ASD and their views on their child’s future prospects.

  • Ng Woon Chian
    Department of Economics, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: The Effects of Smartphone Use on Female Adolescents’ Body Concerns

The study seeks to explore the effects of smartphone’s appearance-related content on female adolescents’ body esteem and social appearance anxiety.

  • Wang Jiaqi Joy
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University

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2014 Grant Call

Topic: Motivation and Family Caregivers of Elderly Individuals: Exploring the Relevance of Self-Determination Theory and Filial Piety

To explore how the components of Self-Determination Theory - autonomy, competence and relatedness - could help to alleviate caregiver burden, specifically in the context of caring for elderly individuals.

  • Nur Atiqah Binte Mohd Farhan
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

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2013 Grant Call

Topic: Tapping the Potential of Married Women in Singapore: The Role of Married Women in Supplementing Singapore’s Shrinking Labour Force

To investigate how women spend their time and the corresponding value that Singaporean women place on unpaid work (e.g. household chores, childcare and eldercare) as well as the challenges that prevent them from remaining or returning to paid work or formal production.

  • Wan Tin Wai
    Department of Economics, Nanyang Technological University
  • Nur Atiqah Binte Abdul Razak
    Department of Economics, Nanyang Technological University
  • Celestia Tan Wan Cheng
    Department of Economics, Nanyang Technological University

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2012 Grant Call

Topic: What is Holding You Back from Giving Birth? An Investigation of the Proximate Factors Affecting the Intention to Give Birth in Singapore

To investigate and provide insights on the proximate factors influencing fertility intentions in Singapore.

  • Vivian Lau Shi Ni
    Department of Economics, Nanyang Technological University
  • Tee Siew Lee
    Department of Economics, Nanyang Technological University
  • Tan Siok Ling
    Department of Economics, Nanyang Technological University
  • Yu Jianfei
    Department of Economics, Nanyang Technological University

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2011 Grant Call

Topic: Singlehood and the Changing Perspectives on Marriage and Childbirth

To examine how various factors could have affected the decisions of Singaporeans on marriage, with a focus on the role of policy.

  • Tan May Jan Clara
    Department of Sociology, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: From Policy to Praxis: Understanding the Implementation Gap in Flexible Working Arrangements

To explore the factors motivating people to take up flexible working arrangements, so as to provide insights into the low take-up rate.

  • Febrin Low Chao Jing
    Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Drivers of Family Social Support for the Elderly in Singapore

To explore the role of family structures, contrasting those of elderly with and without children, in enabling and encouraging the provision of instrumental and emotional support for the elderly and the effect on the provision of instrumental and emotional support by families on the psychological and physical well-being of the elderly.

  • Chong Ruixin
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University

 

Topic: The Value of Marriage

To examine how singles value marriage using an economics framework, to provide insights into how individuals make choices on whether to marry.

  • Gina Tay Pei Ru
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Stephanie Yeo Yan
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Felicia Tan Li Xuan
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Law Xue Fen
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

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2010 Grant Call

Topic: Do you know what they are thinking about? On the Improvement of Social Understanding in Pre-schoolers

To find out whether role-play helps in the Theory of Mind development (i.e. the social understanding) of pre-schoolers in Singapore.

  • Shen Pinxiu
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Long Ying Ying
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: The Impacts of Working Parent(s) on Adolescents: Moderating Effects of Adolescent’s Perception of Working Parent(s) on Family Characteristics-Adolescent’s School Related Outcome Relationship

To test a theoretical model examining the relationship between family characteristics and adolescents’ school related outcomes, and how this relationship may be moderated by adolescents’ perceptions of their working parent(s) in single and dual-income families.

  • Pan Shiying Serene
    Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Messages on Marriage and Family in Singapore’s English Language Mainstream Print Media: A Content Analysis

To understand the problem of Singapore’s marriage and baby gap from the perspective of the media, and the role it plays in influencing the marriage and family decisions of young adults.

  • Benita Aw Yeong Huiyi
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University

 

Topic: Dinner Table Woes: A Decline of the Family

To use the practice of family mealtimes as a lens through which to view the family, exploring how the idea of the family is sustained and experienced. Mealtimes act as a platform via which the family presents itself to itself and others - constituting and reaffirming the idea of the family. The thesis thus illustrates how the family is not a natural entity, but one configured through a range of symbolisms and social practices which change continuously over time.

  • Diana Ang Shu Zhen
    Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: The Social Construction of Fatherhood in Dual-Income Families

To challenge the assumption of minimal paternal involvement in family work by asking how fathers in dual-income household perceive their role through an analysis of the father in the everyday life of the family. It challenges notions of gender division-of-labour to understand the implications of fatherhood today on family-life patterns and family size decisions.

  • Amaria Janoah Ponniah
    Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

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2009 Grant Call

Topic: The Impact of Gender-role Adherence on Singaporean Men and Women Managers’ Career and Family Outcomes

To gain a better understanding of how gender-based views relating to work and home affect Singaporean managers’ career and family outcomes

  • Madeline Ong Li Xuan
    Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University

 

Topic: American TV Series and their Effects on Attitudes Towards Marriage: A Cultivation Analysis

To understand the effects of selected popular American television series on the attitudes of local adult females towards marriage. The study will explore the different messages pertaining to marriage and female singlehood, conveyed through such series and assess the attitudes held by heavy and light viewers.

  • Grace Swee Hui En
    Department of Communications and New Media, National University of Singapore

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2008 Grant Call

Topic: Inter-Generational Relationship Differences in Romantic Beliefs of Singaporean Chinese Women

To understand the Asian beliefs on love and marriage; identify the attachment styles of Singaporean Chinese women; and identify generational differences in the above two objectives.

  • Lee Yoke Wen
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Kelda Tan
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Rachel Lim
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: How the Elderly in Singapore Satisfy their Emotional and Social Needs through Leisure Activities in a Public Space

To examine how senior citizens satisfy their emotional and social needs (in lieu of the family) through leisure activities participation in a public space; and the strategies that they adopt in order to experience graceful ageing.

  • Shen Weixiong
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Impact of Senior Volunteering on Volunteers and Their Family Members in Singaporean Context

To identify benefits and strains as a result of senior volunteering, as perceived by the senior volunteers and their family members; study the relationship between the socio-demographics and individual capacity characteristics of the senior volunteers and the perceived benefits and strains from volunteering; and the association of the benefits and strains from senior volunteering with family functioning.

  • Nagoor Mohideen Fatimah
    Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore
  • Tang Chyi Yueh
    Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore

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Social and Family Research Fund Post-graduate/Academic Category

Click on the following links to scroll to the sub-section directly

 

Eligibility

Post-graduates, academics and researchers at recognised universities and affiliated research institutes in Singapore.

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Project Team

Applicants may submit the proposal individually or jointly with other researchers (up to 5 team members per project).

The research project duration should not exceed 3 years.

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Topics of Inquiry and Indicative Areas of Interest

Applicants are to submit research proposals that are relevant to the work of MSF. Proposals with a primary focus on healthcare/medical research will not be funded, as the SFRF is meant to support research with direct relevance to MSF's areas of work. Proposed research are strongly encouraged to fall under the SFRF Topics of Inquiry. Research proposals on MSF's Indicative Areas of Interest within these Topics of Inquiry will be viewed favourably.

15th Grant Call (2022) - Topics of Inquiry and Indicative Areas of Interest

Topic 1: Enabling Families with Risk Factors/Additional Needs

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Understanding the challenges faced by families with risk factors and/or additional needs, how they cope and what more can be done to help. Such families include families with persons with disabilities, children/young persons in out-of-home care, persons-at-risk (e.g., family violence), neglected elderly, problem gamblers, those with incarceration history etc.

 

Topic 2: Building Strong Foundations for Families

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Understanding motivations and types of support needed for marriage and parenthood decisions
  • Understanding the various familial ties/support (e.g., caregiving, grandparenting, active fathering, spousal division of household duties etc.) across diverse family archetypes and families across different life stages (e.g., families with infants, pre-schoolers, families with teens and tweens children)
  • Studying outcomes relating to such familial support and how to encourage closer relations and greater support
  • Studying the influence of shrinking household sizes on familial support

 

Topic 3: Facilitating Better Outcomes for Low-Income Households

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Identifying risks and/or protective factors (e.g. skills, strengths, resources) among low-income families - How to mitigate risk factors and increase protective factors to lead to better outcomes, including community-led and asset-based models
  • Understanding the profiles, needs and outlook of low-income elderly; how community and social services can support aging in place and mitigate risks of social isolation and unstable housing

 

Topic 4: Early Childhood Education: Support for Children, Families, and Operators

Indicative Areas of Interest:

  • Understanding the best way to provide support for children from low-income families and children with developmental needs
  • Examining impact and quality of preschool education (e.g. preschool factors that influence child outcomes, effect of educator-related factors including teacher training on teaching quality/child development, quality of teaching and interactions in preschools, child outcomes of preschool support for child's bilingual acquisition)

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Funding

Post-graduate students

Successful applicants will:

  • Receive grants of up to S$150,000 per research project
  • Sign a Research Agreement with MSF on the terms of funding

Stages of funding

  • After the signing of the Research Agreement, MSF will disburse up to 40% of the approved grant or S$15,000, whichever is lower, as the first tranche of funding.
  • Subsequent tranches, each capped at a maximum of 30% of the approved grant, will be disbursed after receiving:
    1. Progress report (consisting of project progress and expenditure report)
    2. Receipts and supporting documents
  • MSF will disburse the remaining amount based on actual expenditure after the assessment of:
    1. Final report approved by applicant’s supervisor (to submit within 2 months after completing the project)
    2. Primary research output (including questionnaires and anonymised research output e.g. datasets, interview transcripts, electronic resources)
    3. Progress report on the research project, including all receipts and supporting documents
  • Funding that has been disbursed but was not used upon the completion of the research project must be returned to MSF.

Academics and Researchers

Successful applicants will:

  • Receive grants of up to S$150,000 per research project (inclusive of the Institutional Indirect Research Cost)
  • Sign a Research Agreement with MSF on the terms of funding

Stages of funding

  • After the signing of the Research Agreements with MSF, MSF will disburse 50% of the approved grant to the institution, as the first tranche of funding.
  • Subsequent tranches, each capped at a maximum of 30% of the approved grant, will be disbursed after receiving:
    1. Progress report (consisting of project progress and expenditure report)
    2. Receipts and supporting documents
  • MSF will disburse the remaining amount based on actual expenditure after the assessment of:
    1. Final report (to submit within 2 months after completing the project)
    2. Primary research output (including questionnaires and anonymised research output e.g. datasets, interview transcripts, electronic resources)
    3. Progress report on the research project including all receipts and supporting documents
  • Funding that has been disbursed but was not used upon the completion of the research project must be returned to MSF.

Funding terms

The grant should be used exclusively for conducting the research project, including:

  • Cost of engaging a research company or Research Assistants
  • Transport cost incurred during local fieldwork
  • Incentives or tokens for respondents
  • Printing cost of survey questionnaires and other fieldwork materials
  • Other items necessary for conducting the research

The grant does not cover expenses such as:

  • Tuition fees, other administrative charges and training expenses imposed by the universities as part of the course of study
  • Salary costs of the Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator(s)
  • Overseas research travel expenses
  • Purchase of hardware or equipment
  • Purchase of software and license
  • Refreshments for meetings

MSF will fund only approved expenditures incurred after the signing of the Research Agreement with the successful applicants.

Applicants should secure approval of their research proposals from their project supervisor (for post-graduate students), or acknowledgement by Head of Department (for academics and researchers) before submitting the application.

Upon successful application, recipients should obtain clearance from the Institution’s Research Ethics Review Board before any funds can be disbursed.

Successful applicants shall not receive any research funding from other agencies. Changes to the research project cannot be made without prior written consent of MSF.

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Application Process

Applicants are to submit one copy of the following documents in Microsoft Word DOCX format to MSF_SFRF_Secretariat@msf.gov.sg:

  • Completed application form: Download the application form hereSFRF PG Academic Application Form
  • Research proposal (requirements are specified in Section 5 of the application form)
  • Curriculum vitae (CV) of applicant(s) (requirements are specified on Page 4 of the application form)
  • Supporting documents (if any)

The application for the 15th Grant Call (Postgraduate /Academic Category) will close on 28th February 2023. The results will be available approximately 5 months after the closing date. MSF reserves the right to cancel an application if the required application materials are not submitted to the SFRF Secretariat by the closing date.

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Evaluation Criteria

MSF will consider the following factors:

  • The relevance of the research within the applied Topic of Inquiry
  • The relevance of the research to the Indicative Areas of Interest
  • The relevance of the research in promoting understanding of social and family trends and issues in Singapore
  • The contribution of the research to social and family policy development in Singapore
  • The relevance of the research to the SFRF objectives of promoting ground-up research initiatives
  • The rigour of the proposed research methodology and analytical techniques
  • The proposed project costs

The grant is awarded on a competitive basis and reviewed by both MSF and external reviewers. MSF’s decision is final.

Applicants are to submit research proposals that are relevant to the work of MSF and should refer to this webpage for Topics of Inquiry and Indicative Areas of Interest and past projects.

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Publication and Data Sharing

MSF supports SFRF recipients in presenting and publishing your research findings (e.g. in journals, conferences and other channels), subject to the terms stated in the Research Agreement endorsed by both parties.

MSF may also invite SFRF recipients to share research findings at suitable platforms.

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Contact

For more information or queries, please contact MSF Social and Family Research Fund (SFRF) Secretariat at email MSF_SFRF_Secretariat@msf.gov.sg

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Frequently Asked Questions


Application

Can I submit more than one application for each grant cycle?

Yes, each application will be considered on its own merits. MSF will take into account the quality and relevance of the research proposal, including the researcher’s ability to undertake concurrent projects.


I am interested in applying for the SFRF research grant. Are applications accepted throughout the year?

The SFRF is open for application once a year. Any application submitted outside the application period will not be accepted. Please refer to the SFRF webpage at https://www.msf.gov.sg/researchfund for the application period.


Who can apply

Am I eligible to apply for the SFRF research grant if I am a researcher from a local polytechnic or a local hospital?

The grant is currently open to researchers from local universities and affiliated research institutes. You may submit your proposal, which will be assessed on its own merits.


I am a previous SFRF grant recipient, who is interested to conduct further study of the same SFRF project, can I apply for the funding again?

Yes, we welcome you to apply.


Am I able to submit a joint application with researchers from other institutions/organisations for the SFRF research grant?

Yes, we welcome you and your team to apply. The Lead Member of the project team will have to be from a local university or its affiliated research institutes.


Funding

Can I apply for higher quantum of SFRF research grant (e.g. for longitudinal study) in my application?

MSF will consider your request for support of a higher quantum of SFRF research grant on a case-by-case basis.


Can I start the SFRF project according to the planned start date in my research proposal before MSF has informed me on the outcome of my SFRF application?

You can choose to start your project based on your timeline. However, please note that MSF will only fund approved research expenditures incurred after the Research Agreement is signed.


Data Sharing

Can my Research Assistant (RA) use the research findings of the SFRF funded research for his/her thesis project?

Yes, please indicate your request in the SFRF application form. Do inform MSF in advance via email before you disclose any data or information from the SFRF-funded project to your RA for his/her thesis project.

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Past SFRF Post-graduate/Academic Recipients and Projects

Click on the following links to scroll to the year of the Grant Call directly

 

2021 Grant Call

Topic:Disparities in Trends in Diet Quality Among Singaporean Adults: 2006 to 2016

The purpose of this study is to investigate socioeconomic disparities in trends in diet quality and the impact of low diet quality on health and economic outcomes between 2006 and 2016 among Singaporean adults.

  • Soye Shin
    Duke-NUS Medical School
  • Eric Andrew Finkelstein
    Duke-NUS Medical School

 

Topic:Understanding the Impact of Residential Relocation on Rental Flat Residents

Project summary to be confirmed upon research ethics clearance.

  • Tan Shin Bin
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore
  • Shannon Ang
    Department of Sociology, Nanyang Technological University
  • Lim Jingzhou
    Merpati Kaki

 

Topic:Typologies of Support Exchanges with Social Networks and Maternal Wellbeing in Low-Income Working Mothers with Young Children

Project summary to be confirmed upon research ethics clearance.

  • Sungwon Yoon
    Duke-NUS Medical School

 

Topic: Including Preschool Children with Developmental Needs: How Attitude, Perceived School Support and Self-Efficacy of Singapore Teachers Influence Their Use of Inclusive Classroom Practices

Project summary to be confirmed upon research ethics clearance

  • Kenneth Poon Kin Loong
    National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University
  • Tan Peng Chian
    National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological Universityl

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2020 Grant Call

Topic: The Impact of Parenting Styles and Practices on Children’s Self-regulation and Wellbeing: A Longitudinal Mixed-Methods Investigation

The study aims to generate knowledge on the impact of parenting styles and practices on children's self-regulating behaviours and subjective well-being, that will improve local parenting in relation to children's development.

  • Cheung Hoi Shan
    Yale-NUS College
  • Charissa Siew Lyng Cheah
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland (USA)
  • Fu Siling Charlene
    Singapore Children's Society
  • Ang Pei-Hui Rebecca
    Psychology and Child & Human Development, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Factors influencing help-seeking behaviours among low income group mothers: A mixed methods study

The purpose of the study is to explore maternal experiences, expectations, needs and the factors influencing help-seeking behaviours of the low-income mothers in the postpartum period.

  • Shefaly Shorey
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, National University of Singapore
  • Cornelia Chee
    Department of Psychological Medicine, National University Hospital

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2019 Grant Call

Topic: An Investigation into the Perceptions and Attitudes of the Malay/Muslim Community towards Child Fostering

The project investigates the socio-cultural reasons which may inhibit eligible Malay/Muslim families from registering with the Fostering Scheme that comes under the auspices of the Ministry of Social and Family Development. The Scheme aims to provide an alternative care arrangement for children who are below 18 years of age and in need of a safe, stable and nurturing home. These vulnerable young individuals are placed in foster care because they lack alternative kinship care arrangements.

  • Mohamad Shamsuri Juhari
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Parental Support for Adolescent Romantic Relationships and Achievement of Work-Life Balance in Adulthood

Work-life harmony is a key issue facing families. This study explores the impact of parental practices on children's ability to achieve balance between work and family formation in adulthood. Research suggests that parental support for romantic relationships in adolescence has significant short-term effects on relationship quality and emotional health, but the long term effects in adulthood are unclear. The study investigates five outcomes: a) likelihood and quality of adolescent relationships, b) marriage and relationship formation in adulthood, c) higher educational attainment, d) emotional closeness of relationship with parents in adulthood, and e) emotional wellbeing in adolescence and adulthood.

  • Tan Poh Lin, Jennifer
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Understanding and Improving Job Search Skills Among Mid-Career Workers from Families of Lower-Socioeconomic Status

This project investigates (1) when and why skilled mid-career employees in Singapore fail to leverage job opportunities, particularly those coming from families or backgrounds of lower-socioeconomic status, and (2) how skilled mid-career employees in Singapore can leverage job opportunities more effectively.

  • Marko Pitesa
    Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University
  • Jared Nai
    Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University
  • Lim Jia Hui
    Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University

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2018 Grant Call

Topic: The Social Capital of Low-Income, Single-Parent Families in Singapore: Defining, Measuring and Operationalising Family Social Capital

The overall family well-being of a low-income, single-parent family is compounded by the intersection of both their low-income and their single-parent statuses. This study hence proposes to operationally define and measure the social network of supportive relationships among low-income, single-parent families with adolescents, in the socio-cultural and political context of family-well-being in Singapore.

  • Kwan Jin Yao
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore
  • Anita Lim Chiang Chiang
    TOUCH Community Services Limited
  • Teo Meiyi Stella
    TOUCH Community Services Limited

 

Topic: Social Networks of Young Persons with Disabilities in Singapore – Mobilising Networks to Navigate Transitions

A young person transitions from childhood to young adulthood,gaining independence, leaving education and entering the workforce. For young people with disabilities (YPWD), however, this transition can be challenging. Some remain dependent on caregivers to meet their daily needs, while many require additional supports to navigate this phase. Social networks – formal and informal actors – are crucial in increasing the inclusion of YPWD in society and employment. This study seeks to gain an in-depth understanding of the social networks of YPWD and how these networks help them to meet their social, emotional, financial, physical and other needs.

  • Reuben Wong
    College of Alice and Peter Tan, National University of Singapore
  • Gayatri Kembhavi
    Centre for Evidence and Implementation, Singapore
  • Lee Hing Giap Justin
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

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2017 Grant Call

Topic: Conflict Between Work and Family Lives Among Workers of Lower-Socioeconomic Status

This study investigates how conflict between work and family lives affects skilled employees in Singapore coming from families of lower socioeconomic status (SES). The findings will help improve work-family balance of Singaporean workers coming from lower-SES backgrounds, improve fairness and efficiency of Singaporean organizations, and help harmonizing work and family as central but often competing domains of life in the Singaporean society.

  • Marko Pitesa
    Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University
  • Yuchuan Liu
    Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University

 

Topic: The Influence of Adolescent Temperament/Personality and Parenting on Adolescent Psychosocial Outcomes

This research aims to investigate individual and environmental factors that contribute to an adolescent’s psychological outcomes (mental health and emotional regulation), factors that influence parents’ parenting behaviours, developmental trajectories of adolescent psychological outcomes, and predictors of the trajectories.

  • Keng Shian-Ling
    Yale-NUS College
  • Lee Si Min Stephanie
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, National University of Singapore
  • Hong Yee Shiun, Ryan
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, National University of Singapore

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2016 Grant Call

Topic: “Stay-at-home” Fathers and their Families: What Lessons for Policymakers?

The primary objective in this study is to develop an in-depth understanding of fathers who are full-time caregivers and the impact this has had on them and their families.

  • Yvonne Arivalagan
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore
  • Christopher Gee
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Three-Level Digital Divide and Digital Inclusion of Children from Single-Parent and Two-Parent Households

This proposed study seeks to provide an in-depth analysis on children from different family types, and how their family arrangements, parents’ mediation (or lack thereof) and social networks affect their use of ICTs for learning, living and leisure.

  • Soon Wan Ting Carol
    Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Predictors and Consequences of Work-family Experiences: Study of Working Caregivers of Older Adults

This study aims to examine work-, family-, and health-related consequences of work-family experiences and individual characteristics and organizational factors that can optimize work family experiences and outcomes.

  • Eunae Cho
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Ho Moon-Ho Ringo
    School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Tuo-Yu Chen
    Centre for Ageing Research and Education, Duke-NUS Medical School
  • Cheng Hak Land Grand
    Centre for Ageing Research and Education, Duke-NUS Medical School

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2015 Grant Call

Topic: A Mixed Method Study on First-time Fathers After the Birth of Their Child: Experiences and Predictors of Paternal Involvement

This study explores paternal experiences, expectations, needs and the factors influencing paternal involvement in the postpartum period.

  • Shefaly Shorey
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Generativity: Appreciation and Measurement among Elderly Singaporeans (GAMES)

This two-phase project aims to provide an empirical understanding of generativity and enable its measurement among elderly Singaporeans.

  • Rahul Malhotra
    Centre for Ageing Research and Education, Duke-NUS Medical School
  • Angelique Chan Wei Ming
    Centre for Ageing Research and Education, Duke-NUS Medical School
  • Cheng Hak Land Grand
    Centre for Ageing Research and Education, Duke-NUS Medical School
  • Thang Leng Leng
    Department of Japanese Studies, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: How Parenting Factors and Child Educational Environment Influence Children’s Online Risk-taking Behaviours: A Mixed Method Assessment

The study aims to examine how parental factors (i.e., parental mediation of children’s digital media use, parental literacy of digital media, and general parenting styles) influence children’s online risk-taking perception and behaviour.

  • May Oo Lwin
    Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University
  • Chong Ee Jay
    TOUCH Community Services Limited

 

Topic: The Impact of Media Consumption on the Development of Attentional Control and Emotional Regulation during Early Childhood

The primary objective of this research is to advance our understanding of the impact of heavy media consumption via mobile devices on the development of attentional control and emotional regulation during early childhood.

  • Yang Hwajin
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University
  • Andree Hartanto
    School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University

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2014 Grant Call

Topic: An Insight into the Family Quality of Life of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Singapore

This study utilizes a mix method approach, which encompasses both quantitative and qualitative research methods to investigate the quality of life of families with at least one adult-child with special needs in Singapore.

  • Dalvin Jit Kaur Sidhu
    Early Childhood and Special Needs Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University
  • Kenneth Poon
    Education and Cognitive Development Lab, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far From the Tree: An Experimental Study on Intergenerational Transmission of Preferences

This field experiment study aims to investigate the effects of parental influence on children’s economic preferences, particularly the dimensions on social preference and time preference.

  • He Tai-Sen
    Economics Division, Nanyang Technological University
  • Yohanes Eko Riyanto
    Economics Division, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: A Study on Parents as Mediators of Academic Stress

This study aims to examine the impact of academic stress on Singapore families, particularly focusing on the parents’ expectations and aspirations for their children and how it affects family bonding and familial relations.

  • Teng Siao See
    Institute of Policy Studies, National University of Singapore
  • Mathew Mathews
    Institute of Policy Studies, National University of Singapore

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2013 Grant Call

Topic: Job Connectedness and Work-Family Integration

This study aims to address gaps in literature by examining the psychological processes behind staying connected to work matters through communication technologies.

  • Rashimah Rajah
    Department of Management and Organisation/Business, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: An Exploratory Study on Singaporean Divorcees from Transnational Marriages

A qualitative study on how Singaporean divorcees from transnational marriages acquire the post-divorce support and how existing state policies and services shape the well-being of Singaporean divorcees and their families after the divorce.

  • Jean Yeung Wei-Jun
    Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
  • Sharon Quah Ee Ling

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2012 Grant Call

Topic: The Trait and State Emotion Regulation of Adolescents and the Influence of Parent-Adolescent Communication and Parents’ Emotional Expressivity

The study aims to examine the trait and state emotion regulation of local adolescents, ascertain the characteristics of mother-adolescent, father-adolescent dyad communication, maternal and paternal emotional expressivity and their influence on adolescents’ emotion regulation.

  • Yeo Geck Hong
    Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Adoption Disclosure and Psychological Well-Being of Adoptees

The study aims to examine the disclosure process and find out the effect of disclosure on adoptive family well-being including the child’s outcome; to find out the societal and familial factors that relate to adoption disclosure and to family and child well-being; to explore the strategies parents take in the adoption disclosure process and how they manage the disclosure process.

  • Srinivasan Chokkanathan
    Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore
  • Lim Wei Loong
    Fei Yue Community Services
  • Lili Qin
    Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore

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2010 Grant Call

Topic: On the Improvement of Executive Function in Pre-schoolers from Low-Income Families

The study aims to examine if a specially designed intervention programme would help in promoting the development of executive function in pre-schoolers from low-income families. Executive function refers to the processes required for the conscious control of thought, emotion and action. It relates to decision making, problem solving, self-regulation and behavioural control. The early development of executive function has been linked to school readiness and academic achievement.

  • Qu Li
    Division of Psychology, Nanyang Technological University
  • Moon-ho Ringo Ho
    Division of Psychology, Nanyang Technological University
  • Kerry Lee
    The Centre for Research in Pedagogy and Practice, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Parental Perceptions and Mediation of Computer Gaming in Singapore

The study aims to explore parental perception and mediation strategies adopted with regard to the computer gaming activities of their children in Secondary Schools (aged 12 to 16 years). As Internet penetration in Singapore has reached saturation, and computer gaming is more avidly adopted by young people as a recreational pastime, parents find themselves grappling with this new medium and its impact on their children. By better understanding parental perceptions of computer gaming, and their efforts in mediating their children's involvement in this increasingly popular activity, more effective strategies can be proposed for educating both children and parents in incorporating computer gaming into their domestic media landscape in a healthier fashion.

  • Lim Sun Sun
    Department of Communications and New Media Programme, National University of Singapore
  • Julian Lin
    Department of Communications and New Media Programme, National University of Singapore
  • Jiow Hee Jhee
    Department of Communications and New Media Programme, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Case Control of Asian Adolescents Who Attempted Suicide: Their Temperament, Parenting Experienced, Mental Disorders, Life Stressors and Help Seeking Behaviour

The study aims to identify the factors related to attempted suicides by adolescents (aged 13 to 19 years old). The study would like to examine the temperament of the adolescents, the type of parenting experienced by the adolescents, the presence of mental disorders, life stressors and help-seeking behaviour in adolescents who have attempted suicides.

  • John Wong Chee Meng
    Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore
  • Feng Lei
    Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore
  • Tan Chay Hoon
    Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore
  • Nyein Nyein
    National University Health System

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2009 Grant Call

Topic: The Unmarried Crisis: The Rising Trend of Singlehood Among Chinese Singaporeans

The study aims to gain a sense of how gender perceptions and career views influence the choices and decisions on marriage and to fully understand the relationships between the single and the family of origin.

  • Galvin Jones
    Department of Sociology, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
  • Zhang Yanxia
    Department of Sociology, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Attribution for Maternal Stress in Children with Different Special Needs

The study aims to investigate the attribution variables for maternal stress in children aged 0 to 12 years with special needs. It will examine possible internal and external factors such as children with different special needs, mothers’ socio demographic information, and mothers’ perception of availability of existing family and social support.

  • Yamagata Chihiro
    National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Childcare Staff’s and Parents’ Beliefs about Quality Care for Infants and Toddlers in Centre-based Programs in Singapore

The study aims to examine (i) Perceptions of childcare staff on quality care in terms of their interactions and practices with infants and toddlers in centre-based programmes in Singapore; (ii) Perceptions of childcare staff on the training which they had undergone to prepare them for their interactions and practices with infants; and (iii) Observed nature of childcare staff’s interactions and practices.

  • Karuppiah Nirmala
    Department of Early Childhood and Special Needs Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University

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2008 Grant Call

Topic: The Influence of Child Temperament, Parenting, and Family Context on Psychological Adaptation during Middle Childhood

The study aims to outline a programme of research that focuses on the psychological development of children aged seven to 10 years, in the context of the family. The parents of children in this age range have huge influences on their children’s development through the manner in which they interact with one another. A major theme of the research is to delineate the factors responsible for the children’s ability to adapt well to changes, to build up psychological resilience, and to function successfully at home and in school.

  • Ryan Hong Yee-Shiun
    Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore
  • Tsai Fen-Fang
    Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore
  • Tan Seok Hui
    Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Not Just Babysitting: Case Studies of Caregiver-Child Interactions in Infant Care Centres in Singapore

The study aims to investigate the best practices of infant-toddler child care centres in Singapore, with regard to designing and implementing their programmes, with a focus on examining the interactions between child and caregiver, the environment set up that supports early learning and development and professional development of the edu-carers.

  • Cynthia Lim Ai Ming
    Department of Early Childhood, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University

 

Topic: Impact of Older Adults’ Activity Patterns on the Functioning of Later-life Family

The study aims to explore the range of meaningful activities that older adults are engaged in; to classify their activity patterns; to examine factors associated with these activity patterns; and to investigate the impact of activity patterns on older adults’ well-being and their family functioning. Family functioning will be assessed in four dimensions of family life which includes family adaptability, cohesion, satisfaction with family life, and family leisure life.

  • Hong Song-Iee
    Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore
  • Han Chang-Keun
    Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore
  • Alexander Lee Earn Yung
    Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore

 

Topic: Longitudinal Study of Beyond Parental Control (BPC) cases: Factors Associated with Possible Variation of Court Orders

The study aims to study the Beyond Parental Control (BPC) cases longitudinally over a period of two years to identify factors associated with variation of initial court orders. The researchers seek to study the BPC cases that have either been sent to an approved home or placed under closed statutory supervision, as these are the two most common types of court orders for BPC cases.

  • Rebecca Ang Pei-Hui
    School of Humanities & Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
  • Vivien Huan Swee Leng
    Psychological Studies Academic Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University
  • Chong Wan Har
    Psychological Studies Academic Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University
  • Yeo Lay See
    Psychological Studies Academic Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University
  • Carol Balhetchet
    Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh), Singapore Children’s Society

 

Topic: A Study of the Impact of Caring for Stroke Survivors on Family Structure and the Mental Health of Caregivers

The study aims to examine the factors that influence caregiving burden, quality of life and mental health of caregivers; and to examine the adequacy of existing intervention programmes within the community for stroke caregivers.

  • David Matchar
    Duke-NUS Medical School
  • Stella Quah
    Duke-NUS Medical School
  • Edward Menon
    Saint Andrew’s Community Hospital
  • Chow Wai Leng
    SingHealth Centre for Health Services and Research
  • Angelique Chan
    Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

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